<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "OOne of the most powerful and touching films of the last year is the 70-minute documentary Hale County this morning, tonight, a pointillist portrait of black life in Alabama in which a series of brilliant little moments form a vast and magnificent painting. "data-reactid =" 18 "> One of the most powerful films of last year is the 70-minute documentary Hale County this morning, tonight, a pointillist portrait of black life in Alabama in which a series of small luminous moments form a large and magnificent picture.

In his first film, photographer RaMell Ross, a faculty member at Brown University, avoids narrative structure and social commentary focused on issues in favor of a set of images and hypnotic sounds that leave the viewer draw his own conclusions. Better yet, just bathe in the created feeling. Two totems – the cross and the hoop – hang silently on this community, its population climbing beneath them, around them, trying to get closer to them. "Only Jesus saves," says the neon legend on the cross in front of a church. "So, why is everyone so obsessed with me?" Ross shoots a scene upward through an outdoor hoop with a frayed net, hours passing through accelerated photographs. Another shot of the time lapse, in sardonic counterweight, is driven on the ledge during a college basketball game. In a crazy sequence, a succession of greedy and disembodied hands appears, each carrying a basketball to present themselves as a sacred offering. From the point of view of the hoop, basketball obsession sounds strange and fun.

Two young men, Quincy and Daniel, are at the center of this wonderful film (which begins Friday at the Metrograph Cinema for a week at the Metrograph Cinema). Quincy works in a boring job and, with his wife, Boosie, raises a boy named Kyrie. Daniel, younger, hopes to become a basketball player at Selma University. The historical echo is not lost for Ross, who captures Daniel meditating on Selma in a car. Apparently, there was some sort of event on the famous bridge there. Oprah was present. Yet his celebrity atmosphere is as distant and indifferent to Daniel as that of Martin Luther King Jr .. He is just trying to do it as an athlete and the alternative is unpleasant to contemplate. "Close to everyone," says Ross in one of his intertitles, "works in a catfish factory. Quincy does it, Daniel fears him. For her mother, "After 20 years, Marie could cough a catfish. "

The film is adapted to the feeling of daily duty of the treadmill. ("I make enough money to go back to work," Quincy said at one point.) But his characters are not tragic victims, because Ross manages to convey sympathy to them without turning them into an object of pity. . They are energetic, fun, reflective and enduring, rather than passive or powerless. There is no sinister oppression at work, there are just people who move on. A middle-aged man remembers running barefoot in red clay, picking pecans, learning to twist the neck of a chicken and being treated with a bark of tree to treat strep throat. "What is really poor and impoverished?" He asks himself.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The director, an invisible presence in the film, Boosie seems not enough interested in the project, but Ross hits her with a biting intertitle: "Boosie careth do not about the movie. Still, she leaves Ross' cameras in the room while she gives birth to twins, Karmyn and Korbyn. We see them rest happily next to each other. Then, another devastating title: "Korbyn was buried in the early afternoon," struck by the sudden death syndrome of the infant. After a brief funeral sequence, the family moves on. Resilience seems unimaginable. "Data-reactid =" 22 "> The director, an invisible presence in the film, is no less an arch-key Boosie seems insufficiently interested in the project, but Ross is striking her. a mordant intertitle: "Boosie careth do not about the movie. Still, she leaves Ross' cameras in the room while she gives birth to twins, Karmyn and Korbyn. We see them rest happily next to each other. Then, another devastating title: "Korbyn was buried in the early afternoon," struck by the sudden death syndrome of the infant. After a brief funeral sequence, the family moves on. Resilience seems unimaginable.

Sometimes Ross is funny, for example, Richard Linklater, as when a man wearing a t-shirt bearing the inscription "REAL: Realize that everyone is not normal – do not trust nobody "fantasizes about a time when there were neither weapons nor people. used spears instead. Sometimes, the camera captures nervous, unnamed energy, like when young men sit around a locker room before a basketball game.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The most beautiful images of Ross, free, what qu & # 39; they are lachrymose and the mundane, carry a frivolous cargo, as when a boy seeing the soap on his body in the bathtub becomes the host of a superimposed image of the moon, or that & # 39; 39, a burning rubber tire produces smoke through which the light filters into attractive patterns.Over time, Ross finds serenity and even beauty in the banal, making Hale County in an exquisite work of visual poetry. "data-reactid =" 24 "> The most beautiful images of Ross, free from lachrymosis and the banal, carry a frivolous cargo, as when a boy looks at the soap on his body in the bath becomes the host of a superimposed image of the moon, or a burning rubber tire produces smoke through which the light is filtered in attractive patterns.Over time, Ross finds serenity and even beauty in the world Hale County in an exquisite work of visual poetry.

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